Friday, August 5, 2016

Lindsay Joy on Collaboration, Courage and Her NYC Premiere of In The Event of My Death

Lindsay Joy
"Some of the community found out that there were 'gay themes' and took to writing angry letters to the school..."
-Lindsay Joy
Playwright











What is your play, IN THE EVENT OF MY DEATH about?

Eight small-town twenty-somethings who know each other from high school share an impromptu time of mourning and celebration after the suicide of a mutual friend. It's a play about loss, mourning, and trying to move on.

Did you know your theme going in and did it evolve?

I knew I wanted to tackle the way we mourn and share now. I had a string of folks in my life pass away, and found out via Facebook and that sat badly with me. I was also thinking about the college kids specifically and some stats were released about high school/college suicide rates being higher and that caught me. I would say it was an evolution, for sure. I had the basic construct in my head, and my interviews with the students started to shade and color where the play was going.

How did the students affect the writing and development of the play?

I've never written a play using interviews as source material before. So, it was a whole new world. There were pretty major shifts in the script after each production and I can trace those shift back to emails, texts, and discussions with those students. One pretty major change happened with a character I was struggling with, and a young woman from Centre College wrote to me to say- I think she's queer...I think all of her behavior stems from that. It was a huge A-HA moment for me.

Cast for In the Event of My Death
How did the play change from the first draft read in NYC to the different productions?

HUGE. The basic framework is similar. Friends gathering, one set, one night, realistic, etc. However, the different productions led to new discoveries. Ashland had the emotional soul of the play right from the get-go, and it fed my rewrite for Centre. Centre had the rhythm of the play, and the character beats down to a tee...it was also where I realized this "small play" could play in a big house. From Centre, I cut and cut and cut. The draft for Clark was all about being spare, and their production used technology in a way I hadn't foreseen. The play has shifted yet again...the draft Stable Cable read aloud months ago is quite different from our rehearsal script.

How did the different audiences and communities respond to the play?

I'm very proud to say people were upset about the play before we arrived in Ashland. Some of the community found out that there were "gay themes" and took to writing angry letters to the school. In production, however, it was well-received. There was a high school group that attended the Ashland production, and that was the audience that loved it the most. Kentucky was WILD. Again, the students had heard about some community backlash against the "gay themes", and I was NERVOUS.Padraic Lillis let me get big-headed about it, as they were clapping he was giving me notes- ha!). Clark was more subdued to be sure (smaller space), but I know the students received great feedback from their peers. We shall see how it plays to an Indie Theater savvy house.
We were shown the space and it was huge. Held about 475 people, and I thought- this play is going to die in this house and there is no way they will fill these seats. I was SO wrong. Full houses. People on their feet the second the play ended (not that

How has this process with The Farm Theater changed you as a writer (creatively as well as otherwise.)

Lindsay writing in the window for Write Out Front at DBS
This process has opened me up as a writer. So much of our process is solitary- just me and my computer. This process made me realize there are other ways to construct a play that actually work for me. I think I've become much more aware of what is working in a script dramaturgically, more willing to cut a thing I might like for the betterment of the play. Some of my early work is very "clever" and I think getting past that was vital for me as an artist. It was a fantastic discovery for me to let my characters sit in uncomfortable silences and not add a quip or two to break it up. That might sound like a small thing, but it's huge for me.

What was it like working with different directors? How has it been collaborating with your current director Padraic Lillis, who you've worked with before?

Loved the different directors I worked with. Scott was super hands on, and very communicative. He came at it from a very emotional angle and I think he got some really dynamic work from his students. Patrick (from Centre) was an intellect, always striving for the "why" in every scene. I was lucky enough to rehearse with that group of students (over their Winter Break), and being in the room with Patrick felt like we were prepping for battle. Raymond (from Clark) was experimenting...tinkering (mixed media, projections, etc). A very different experience, but again- a terrific and growing one.

Padraic just gets me. Period. Watching him in the rehearsal room is electric. He's specific, and collaborative, none of that I'll sit behind a table shit. He's up- he's asking questions, he's always finding ways to make it more interesting and feel more real. For me as a writer, it helps to have a person that I share a short hand with. He and I will share a look and then he'll gesture a scissor movement, I nod, and I cut. It's hard to capture how nice that is to be able to trust someone like that.

How do you organize your time? Do you have a day job and a writing schedule?

This is the hardest question to answer honestly. I'm still working on it. I write whenever I can. Before work, after work. After rehearsal, weekends. I should have a schedule that I keep to- I think that works well for so many of my peers, but I've failed myself time and again with a set schedule. I'm a writer that needs deadlines...I need a fire lit under my ass to get things done. Don't get me wrong- I get shit DONE, but I perform better knowing that other people are counting on me. Oh, god- that sounds so bad.

I do have a full-time day job, and I have the terrible habit of saying yes to one too many things. It means I'm almost always burning the candle at both ends.

My goal over the next year is to find a bit more of a work/creative life balance. Part of that balance will mean keeping to a schedule. There. Now I've put it in writing.

What's else are you working on and what's next?

I have a short play called The Cleaners up at the Sam French OOB Fest on August 9th- it's a love story set at a crime scene clean-up. I'm also rewriting a ghost story play set in coastal Maine that I'm quite fond of.


Lindsay Joy’s IN THE EVENT OF MY DEATH is produced by Stable Cable Lab Co. and directed by Padraic Lillis and is running August 6-21 at IRT Theater in NYC with performances Wednesday through Friday at 7pm, Saturday at 3pm & 7pm, Sunday at 3pm, and Monday at 7pm. Tickets ($18; $20 at the door) are available online or by calling Brown Paper Tickets 1-800-838-3006. The performance will run approximately 1 hour, and 45 minutes, with an intermission. 


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